• 00:35 Pirate radio as hub and as a source for music
  • 01:22 Two oppositional radio stations
  • 02:05 Honey: a singing evangelist
  • 02:23 Adele: a punk musician
  • 03:26 The pirate radio phenomena in Italy
31/03/2017 4' 36''

English

Self-taught filmmaker Lizzie Borden is a pioneer of militant queer and lesbian cinema. Her second film, 'Born in Flames', described by Sophie Mayer as “feminist Afro-futurist science fiction”, oozes freshness and relevance even though it was released in 1983. It was produced without a script – through what she calls inductive scripting – and shot over a period of four years with a budget of barely 40,000 dollars. The editing table then became one of her closest allies: guided by intuition and tenacious lucidity, she turned to pseudo-documentary to make up for the shortcomings resulting from precariousness and amateurism in the film world.

Against this backdrop, pirate radio became one of the protagonists and main motifs of the narrative thread of 'Born in Flames'. In this short excerpt, Lizzie Borden explains the various reasons that led her to take an interest in the phenomenon of European free radio, and how it helped her to connect the various agendas of this cult film.

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SpecialsRADIOACTIVITYLizzie Bordenpirate radiofree radioDeleted Scenesradio